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Movement

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Diet

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Quiet

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Happiness


Running with poor posture is like riding a bike with a broken chain, crooked wheels & flat tyres.

Hard work, uncomfortable and highly likely to cause an injury!

Calling all runners!

Conditioning for runners by Parinama can help  you run pain free and unlock athletic potential.


  • Injuries
  • Fix one issue only to have another spring up in its place
  • Nagging aches and pains
  • Missing runs, so no consistency
  • Speed – not getting any faster
  • Poor strength / condition
  • Cross training not helping 
  • Performance stuck in a rut

80% of runners are injured every year.

Conditioning for runners will help you achieve optimal performance.  That is, achieve your running goals without injury.  Runners knee, plantar fasciitis or IT band syndrome among many others are signs that your body is not in a fit condition for the running you are doing.  But why?

Consider an average 24 hours – sleep 8 hours, work 8-10 hours, exercise 1 – 2 hours.  What you do in the 14 hours you are not exercising will dictate how fit your body is for running.  If you sit for a big part of that, use screens, wear shoes that restrict the movement of your feet, then the chances are your body will have postural dysfunction, muscle imbalance and poor basic moment patterns.

Add running to this picture and pain and injury will not be far behind.

injured runner

Running creates a force about 3 and a half times body weight.

John weighs 85 KG and runs 6 miles, 3 times a week, 10-minute miles with a cadence of 160 (how many times your feet hit the ground in a minute).  Poor posture is causing his knees and feet to roll in when he runs.  His running style is inefficient and unstable.  There is 297 KG of force going through his knees every time his feet hit the floor which is 28,800 steps per week.

Is it any wonder he has a knee injury?


runners conditioning assessments

Conditioning for runners by Parinama breaks down barriers to long term success.

We take time to understand you and your goals.  Our full body, detailed assessment techniques identify the underlying red flags which contribute to pain, injury and imbalances. Just like there are key metrics to measure your sporting performance we have our own to measure progress.

Phase 1 is to get you out of pain, then create rock solid foundations, e.g. your necessary mobility and stability.  A lot of programs skip this, leaving you to build your performance on a shaky base of postural dysfunction, muscle imbalance and reduced range of motion.

We take a ground up approach, breaking down barriers to long term success.  You will see performance benefits even at phase 1.

Conditioning for runners is sport specific, not general fitness.

Phase 2 gets sports specific!  We will optimise your strength, endurance, agility, co-ordination, power, balance in line with the optimal needs of your running – be that fell, road, ultra or 10k.  We will recreate key movement patterns to focus down into gait specific work.  Improving performance whilst working on balance to minimise injury risk and aid recovery.

We will not “beast your body” but rather work intelligently, in harmony with your body and mind to deliver bespoke results.

By understanding your work. home and sporting schedules we can ensure that your conditioning for runners sessions are appropriate, working hard at the right times and ensuring you have recovery when needed.

chi running is part of conditioning for runners

ChiRunning

Cross training is only half the picture, running skill is the other side of peak performance.  We combine sports specific conditioning for runners with ChiRunning so you can build great technique and efficiency. Reducing risk of injury and achieving more with less perceived effort.


Sick of being injured?  Want to enjoy running for years to come?

Drop us a line, we would love to have a chat…. Free consultation with no commitment

What have you got to lose?